Stories That Caught Our Attention This Week in For-Profit Education

Obama Administration Revisits For-Profit Debt Regulations

This week the Obama administration resumed their efforts against for-profit colleges that leave students in debt and unemployed. This current action renews a 2-year-old battle over regulations, including the gainful employment act.

APSCU mounted a $13m lobbying campaign that resulted in a federal judge striking down the regulations last year. Steve Gunderson, the president and chief executive of APSCU, said in a statement that the group was “extremely disappointed,” calling the effort a “faulty and confrontational process.”

The Department of Education declined to comment on the rulemaking process, beyond describing how negotiators will be selected and when public hearings will be scheduled.

Higher Education and the Recession

The Associated Press has written an article that details how higher education has changed

in the wake of the global financial crisis that struck five years ago. The article breaks down the four most significant growths in learning that have come from the recession and why they have happened. The four are certificates, competency-based learning, accreditation and MOOCs.

The article noted that access to education has become more urgent, more crowded, and more expensive, all while becoming more flexible and accessible.

Apollo Falls Upon News of Declining Enrollments/Profits

On Wednesday The Apollo Group stock fell the most in eight months after saying that net income and new enrollment tumbled in its fiscal third quarter. Apollo dropped 10 percent to $17.39, the most since October 2012. The Phoenix-based company has declined 17 percent this year.

“We need to get a clarity about the true causes of the continued deterioration in new student enrollment,” said Jarrel Price, an analyst at Height Analytics in an interview with Bloomberg. “These results may be a further indication that rebranding takes time.”

By Marc Apple